Happy New Year!

Thank you all for your support of Small Batch and other essay and article publications in 2014. I am happy to announce an exciting event in Buffalo, NY on February 12th as part of the Larkin Square Author Series with more events and press to be announced shortly.

Have a great year!

– Suzanne

Press & Event Update for SMALL BATCH!

Exciting things are happening for SMALL BATCH: Pickles, Cheese, Chocolate, Spirits and the Return of Artisanal Food.  Check out last week’s press round up and details for the Pittsburgh, New York City, and Boston events!

Radio:

Author’s Corner reading – check your local NPR listings and listen here: https://www.authorscorner.org/

Eat Your Words interview on Heritage Radio – recorded on Sunday and archived here: http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/6988-Eat-Your-Words-Episode-204-Small-Batch-Foods

Upcoming events:

Pittsburgh: THURSDAY, Acquired Taste Reading Series 10/23 at Wigle Whiskey in Pittsburgh – readings, food, music & more!

details: https://www.facebook.com/events/388567687961217/

NYC: WEDNESDAY 11/5 at Jimmy’s No. 43 from 6 – 8pm – Baked, Bottled, & Brined: A Pop Up Food Market – food, drinks, meet the artisans and chat with the author!

details: https://www.facebook.com/events/1477060325894691/

Cambridge, MA: Saturday 11/15 at Atwood’s Tavern from 3 – 5pm – Food, drinks, reading – details to come!

 

Recent print & online press:

Pittsburgh City Paper: http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/suzanne-cope-connects-old-and-new-trends-in-food-in-new-book/Content?oid=1784088

Pittsburgh Post Gazette: http://www.post-gazette.com/life/food-column/2014/10/16/The-Food-Column-8/stories/201410160039

Wandering Educators: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/books-film/books/small-batch-pickles-cheese-chocolate-spirits-and-return-artisanal-food.html

SMALL BATCH is almost here!

I’ve been quiet here as I have been pushing my upcoming book SMALL BATCH: Pickles, Cheese, Chocolate, Spirits and the Return of Artisanal Food which is publishing next week! SMALL BATCH looks at the cultural history of artisanal food and details the … Continue reading

Locavore on the Road: Artisanal Cheese & the Marin County Cheese Trail

I’ve spent what would likely add to up to countless hours contemplating the purchase of various cheeses at locations ranging from Whole Foods to Stinky Bklyn to a “serve yourself” fridge on a country roadside in Western Massachusetts. I clearly remember … Continue reading

On “Artisanal” and “Sustainable”

As I’m researching and writing my book Small Batch: The Fall and Rise of Artisanal Cheese, Chocolate, Pickles, and Alcoholic Spirits, I purposely chose the term “artisanal” in part because it seemed to be the best to represent that handmade, … Continue reading

Homemade Mozzarella

I often buy balls of mozzarella from Fiore at the local farmer’s market. For $5 I get a sandwich bag of deliciousness, almost always made that morning. Which got me thinking – if this small cheese company can make countless balls of mozz before 9am, it can’t be too hard for me to make a few of my own! I did a bit of research and discovered that besides milk, I would need rennet and citric acid, both of which can be bought from any number of cheese making sources. Luckily, New England Cheesemaking Supply Company, one of the best known and respected sources, is located barely more than an hour away (thus supporting a local business as well).  Online, I ordered the beginner mozarella and ricotta kit – promising 30 minute mozz – all I needed to add was the milk.

A few days later when my kit was delivered, I made a quick trip to Sherman’s for a gallon of milk. I buy all of my dairy from Sherman’s anyway, but in particular fresh cheese must be made from milk that isn’t “ultra-pasteurized” – which is about the only kind that most large grocery stores sell. Thus proper sourcing of the key ingredient is important. Procuring the milk was almost the hardest part – once home there were only a few steps of heating the milk, adding the citric acid and rennet, stirring and stretching. NE Cheesemaking Supply Co was right! – I had four balls of mozz ($20 worth by farmer’s market prices) less than 30 minutes later – ready to be sampled. So easy – and delicious!